A Happy Scientist Costume

This year my older kids chose a profession for their Halloween costumes; one will be an astronaut and the other a policeman. Of course my youngest is still too young to have an opinion but I thought, “Hey, it may be my one of my last years to get to choose her costume so why not make her a scientist!”

But when I searched for DIY girl scientist costumes this is what I found – mad ones. What is to be mad about on Halloween? Why not make science just a tad bit sunnier? So I tweaked these Michael’s costume instructions to make my littlest scientist a happy one. 


What you need: 

  • Tie dyed t-shirt  (about two times bigger than normal size): I found mine here
  • Pink duct tape
  • A black sharpie marker
  • Safety glasses: These are old ones that we have but you can also buy safety glasses at Walmart or LakeShore Learning.
  • Plastic beaker

How you do it: I followed Michael’s tutorial here for turning a tshirt into a labcoat but substituted the white shirt for a tie-dyed one!  Easy-peasy!

Who says being a scientist means going mad and having crazy hair. Let’s have happy adorable scientists who can experiment AND rock the tie dyed lab coat!

I hope you are having as much fun as we are getting ready for Halloween!

Categories: science art Tags: , ,
Rock Painting featuring Gutsy Girl Dr. Jennifer Wiseman

This female scientists is featured in one of my favorites book series, Gutsy Girls by Amy Sullivan. I just love how the book makes Dr. Jennifer Wiseman so relatable to our girls who may also love rocks, exploring outdoors, animals, and outer space.

Jennifer went on to pursue her love of science by discovering a comet and teaching children how awesome our God is by studying the wonders of His universe. The best part is she shows us that it’s okay to love science AND God! What a great role model for our girls!

I highly recommend this Gutsy Girls book for your science loving girl’s library. You can buy it here.

The book illustrations are amazing – so much that it inspired our rock painting craft! Check out our favorite page featuring a beautiful picture of outerspace. I just love how Allie is soaking up this picture. 

 

 What you need: rocks, black acrylic paint, Gelly Roll pens found here

 How you do it:

  • Clean and dry the rocks
  • Paint with acrylic black paint and let it dry
  • Use pens to create the art that inspires you!

Whats the science:

One of the five natural sciences is earth science. Exploring and finding rocks are such a great way to explore our earth and ask questions about how the rocks were made, what they are made of, and how they got their shape. My daughter likes nothing more than to smash rocks (with eye protection) to see what it looks like inside. No doubt she’s looking for crystals or geodes!

Enjoy learning about this female scientist and doing a sweet rock painting craft with your gutsy girl!

Categories: 3 ingredient experiments, lovely conversations, science art, STEM, thoughts of a girl engineer Tags: ,
Make an easy thaumatrope (for the love of Texas)!

I’ll be completely honest, this is a hard post to write after experiencing Hurricane Harvey up close and personal. I didn’t know when it would feel like the right time to start sharing science experiments with you after such a devastating event that happened in Texas.

The cities that were devastated by Hurricane Harvey were places of my childhood. I was born in Corpus Christi, grew up in Victoria, spent many summers in Rockport and Port O’Conner and have tons and tons of friends and family up and down the Texas coast. Not to mention that downtown Houston was my home for 13 years before I moved north to the Woodlands.

Many of you that read this blog left before the storm only to come back to flooded homes and a future of rebuilding. Some of you stayed only to watch the flood waters rising, prayed that it would stop before it got in your homes, and hoped the tornado alarms wouldn’t wake your sleeping babies. It was scary. It was raw. I love you and I am still praying for each one of you.

I still remember the day that the sun finally came out. My 7 year old drew this picture about 20 minutes before it broke through the clouds here in the Woodlands. I’ve never been so happy to see the sun. (It beat seeing the solar eclipse any day.)

There are many places that are accepting donations for Hurricane Harvey. Please consider donating to the American Red Cross to continue helping the people that desperately need your support.

Many of your kids do not have school starting back up for a few more days. I hope this post will help you bring a little sunshine and science to them. Won’t you consider making this easy unique craft for the love of Texas!?

What you need: 8.5X11″ paper, tape, straw, scissors, crayons, black marker

How to do it:

      • Fold 8.5 X 11″ paper three times
      • Unfold and cut paper in half and cut in half again
      • Fold paper and write “WE” and “TEXAS” with a space in the middle
      • Turn the paper over and draw a heart in the middle of the paper and color
      • Tape a straw in between the folded paper
      • Tape the folded paper to make sure it stays together
      • Twist the straw between your hands and watch the thaumotrope in action!

    What’s the science: A thaumatrope is a type of optical illusion and an early precursor to animation. Assemble one with your kids and see how creative they can be with imagining shapes to fill the blank space. It will inspire their curiosity which of course is what science is all about!

Categories: 5 minute experiments, science art Tags:
Easy No Sew Big Dipper Pillow – That GLOWS in the dark!

Some of my fondest memories of science as a kid were looking into the night sky with my Mom in search of the Big Dipper and another time trying to spot Halley’s Comet with my granddaddy’s old telescope. So it warms my heart when today my 7 year old daughter tells me that when she grows up she wants to be the first person on Mars. As her mom I cringe a little thinking of the long journey and the dangers of space travel, but I also want to help her reach for the stars. So, I decided we would make an easy no-sew pillow with a Big Dipper design to keep her dreaming big dreams while teaching her about my favorite constellation. You can try it too with your science girls!

I am so honored to write this post for a blogging friend of mine with a similar passion at Go Science Girls. For instructions to make this awesome pillow check out her site here

Categories: 3 ingredient experiments, science art Tags: ,