Rainbow Science

Who doesn’t stop and stare when they see a rainbow? And what kid doesn’t want to do science when the results burst into a colorful rainbow pattern? I hope you enjoy this colorful roundup on this first day of spring!

My kids love this simple walking water rainbow.

Candy and science. It’s what classics are made of!

Watch a rainbow of color explode in the Rainbow Milk experiment.

I dare you to do this Rainbow Magic Bag over the over your head like we did!

Add all the colors of the rainbow to make an amazing shaving cream Rain Cloud!

And my favorite, make your very own rainbow in your own backyard!

Categories: 3 ingredient experiments, science art Tags: ,
The Classic Skittles Experiment 

Is it just me or is it now in style to get back to the classics… classic fashion, classic books, class acts? What makes something classic anyways? For kid’s science I have found that classic experiments are predictable, easy to set up, have a wow factor, and produce a ‘stick-ability’ in the minds of the beholders.

So for Science Friday at Andrew’s preschool I knew this would be a perfect activity to do alongside learning about rainbows. How many preschoolers can say that they know what a rainbow tastes like? Hint: They think it tastes like sugar and honestly I’d like to think if I could taste a real rainbow it would taste a lot like sugar too!

Here’s what you need:

  • Skittles – you can often find a small box of them for $1
  • White paper plates
  • Water

When I am doing science with kids I always look for way to make it easy to clean up. This is probably the #1 reason I don’t do science at home every single day is because I don’t want to make a mess.  But if all I need to do is fold up a paper plate when it is done then I’m all about it.

Here’s how you do it: 

  • Arrange 10 skittles around the small paper plate in a rainbow pattern
  • Pour water in the plate until all the Skittles are touching water
  • That’s it… classic.

What’s the science?

For 3 year olds, we talked about what colors are in a rainbow, what pattern we should make for a rainbow, and guessed about why Skittles dissolve in water.

For older kids, you can ask them to guess if the Skittles will dissolve faster in warm water or hypothesize on why the colors don’t initially mix together. The Skittles will dissolve faster the warmer the water because the warm water molecules are farther apart and able to fit the sugar molecules more quickly to form the solution.   Here is an interesting article about why the colors don’t mix together in M&Ms similar to Skittles. (Sounds like another experiment in the making!)

After Science Friday I had one happy guy. I mean really…candy and science is a classic winning combination every. single. time.

Here’s a fast motion video but the effect will take a few minutes for the colors to join up in the center of the plate.  Enjoy!

Categories: lovely conversations Tags: , , ,
Valentine Heart Soap Boats

I ran across an easy surface tension experiment using soap boats and thought I would give it a twist for Valentine’s Day!  Needless to say it was a hit with the three year old and I can’t wait to show my first grader after school.  Check this out!

Here’s what you need:

  • an index card
  • a shallow baking dish
  • water
  • dish soap

Here’s how you do it:

  1. Draw a heart on an index card, color, and cut out
  2. Fill a shallow baking dish halfway with water
  3. Place the index card heart in the water
  4. Add a small drop of dish soap to the “V” in the heart and watch the heart zoom along!

What is the science?

The index card heart floats on top of the water due to surface tension. Surface tension is the water molecules creating a skin on the surface of the water. When you add dish soap the surface tension breaks and propels the heart boat forward.  Once the surface tension is broken you have to start over with clean water for the second (and third) boats.

This is a definite must to entertain the kiddos for Valentine’s Day! Enjoy!

Categories: 3 ingredient experiments, 5 minute experiments, science art Tags: , ,
Learn Binary Code with a Valentines Twizzler Necklace

What’s more fun than an edible candy necklace? It’s a candy necklace with a secret message!   Every year I pursue Pinterest to find a fun easy class Valentines card for my kids. This year I thought why not make it a fun learning activity too since Allie is old enough to help me assemble them.

I ran this idea past her and we thought the secret code could be the computer language of the ASCII alphabet.  This alphabet is made up of 1’s and 0’s (a binary code) and can be deciphered using two different colored Twizzlers.

What you need: Rainbow Twizzler Twists and jelly cord. (Not only are they fun colors but I found that Rainbow Twizzlers are easier to string on a necklace.)


How to do it:

  • Print out this pdf of ASCII binary code

  • Decide what secret word you want to put on your necklace (we chose the word ‘LOVE’ which is fourteen 1’s and thirteen 0’s)
  • Cut two colors of Twizzlers to 1-1/2″ sections  ( You’ll get about 7 sections per rope)
  • String the last letter on first and tie a knot
  • Continue stringing the binary code for each letter with a knot in between letters
  • Tie a bow to connect the ends of the necklace together

What’s the science?

Here is a fun video of why computers use a binary system of 1’s and 0’s to represent numbers and letters. This was a great hands on way to learn coding while making super fun gifts for friends! What kid doesn’t like a decoding challenge? (Actually the real challenge is to not eat it before you decipher the code!)  Happy Valentine’s Day y’all!

 

Categories: 3 ingredient experiments, gift guides, lovely conversations, science art Tags: , ,