Screeching Ghost Balloons 

Is it just me or when stores cleared their back to school items in late August then Halloween decorations were put in their place?  Stores have wanted us to feel like it’s fall but it’s even hard for me to drink a pumpkin spice latte when it’s still 90°F outside.

I do LOVE the fall especially because my youngest has her birthday around Halloween so I always have my eyes peeled for cute party decor and Halloween games with a science twist of course!

I recently saw this experiment on Steve Spangler and thought what a great Halloween science activity! All you have to do is draw a cute little ghost on the balloon and you’ve got a real haunted house sound! And of course my youngest really got the hang of it!

What you need: a white balloon, a black permanent marker, and a hex nut


 What you do:

  1. Place hex nut in balloon
  2. Blow up balloon and tie
  3. Draw a ghostly figure
  4. Twirl the balloon around until the hex nuts spin on the inside

Warning: Depending on the age of the hex nut it could cause the balloon to pop if it nicks the side. Supervise young kiddos when trying this at home.

What’s the science:

This experiment demonstrates centripetal force – the force that keeps the hex nut moving on a circular path. Other examples of centripetal force are satellites when they stay in orbit around the earth or when a hula hoop continues to spin around your body when you hula! The screeching sound is caused by the vibration of the balloon when the hex nut comes in contact with the latex.

For more fun Halloween experiments check out this blog’s header menu labeled ‘Halloween’.  It has my favorite She Loves Science Halloween posts over the years!

I hope you are able to enjoy this experiment with cooler fall temperatures!

Categories: 3 ingredient experiments, 5 minute experiments Tags: , ,
Make an easy thaumatrope (for the love of Texas)!

I’ll be completely honest, this is a hard post to write after experiencing Hurricane Harvey up close and personal. I didn’t know when it would feel like the right time to start sharing science experiments with you after such a devastating event that happened in Texas.

The cities that were devastated by Hurricane Harvey were places of my childhood. I was born in Corpus Christi, grew up in Victoria, spent many summers in Rockport and Port O’Conner and have tons and tons of friends and family up and down the Texas coast. Not to mention that downtown Houston was my home for 13 years before I moved north to the Woodlands.

Many of you that read this blog left before the storm only to come back to flooded homes and a future of rebuilding. Some of you stayed only to watch the flood waters rising, prayed that it would stop before it got in your homes, and hoped the tornado alarms wouldn’t wake your sleeping babies. It was scary. It was raw. I love you and I am still praying for each one of you.

I still remember the day that the sun finally came out. My 7 year old drew this picture about 20 minutes before it broke through the clouds here in the Woodlands. I’ve never been so happy to see the sun. (It beat seeing the solar eclipse any day.)

There are many places that are accepting donations for Hurricane Harvey. Please consider donating to the American Red Cross to continue helping the people that desperately need your support.

Many of your kids do not have school starting back up for a few more days. I hope this post will help you bring a little sunshine and science to them. Won’t you consider making this easy unique craft for the love of Texas!?

What you need: 8.5X11″ paper, tape, straw, scissors, crayons, black marker

How to do it:

      • Fold 8.5 X 11″ paper three times
      • Unfold and cut paper in half and cut in half again
      • Fold paper and write “WE” and “TEXAS” with a space in the middle
      • Turn the paper over and draw a heart in the middle of the paper and color
      • Tape a straw in between the folded paper
      • Tape the folded paper to make sure it stays together
      • Twist the straw between your hands and watch the thaumotrope in action!

    What’s the science: A thaumatrope is a type of optical illusion and an early precursor to animation. Assemble one with your kids and see how creative they can be with imagining shapes to fill the blank space. It will inspire their curiosity which of course is what science is all about!

Categories: 5 minute experiments, science art Tags:
Easy No Sew Big Dipper Pillow – That GLOWS in the dark!

Some of my fondest memories of science as a kid were looking into the night sky with my Mom in search of the Big Dipper and another time trying to spot Halley’s Comet with my granddaddy’s old telescope. So it warms my heart when today my 7 year old daughter tells me that when she grows up she wants to be the first person on Mars. As her mom I cringe a little thinking of the long journey and the dangers of space travel, but I also want to help her reach for the stars. So, I decided we would make an easy no-sew pillow with a Big Dipper design to keep her dreaming big dreams while teaching her about my favorite constellation. You can try it too with your science girls!

I am so honored to write this post for a blogging friend of mine with a similar passion at Go Science Girls. For instructions to make this awesome pillow check out her site here

Categories: 3 ingredient experiments, science art Tags: ,
Halley Harper’s Balloon Rocket Race 

In the newly release book, Halley Harper; Science Girl Extraordinaire, Halley and her friends need to solve this riddle about Newton’s Laws of Motion to win the challenge! You should try it too!

Blast off into the sky

You’ll see me moving by

Off to the moon into the stars

This law of motion could get you to Mars!

What you need: String, a balloon, a straw (cut in half), tape

How to do it:

Thread the string through the straw. Tie off both ends of the string to a doorknob and a chair. Blow up the balloon and hold the open end shut. Carefully tape the balloon to the straw. Move the balloon to one of the ends of the string. Let go and observe how the air in the balloon pushes the balloon forward.

What’s the science?

The air pressure inside the balloon is balanced when the balloon is closed. When the balloon is opened, the pressure inside the balloon is forced out. The forces are then unbalanced causing the balloon to shoot forward. It is an example of Newton’s Third Law of Motion: for every action there is an equal but opposite reaction.

Categories: 3 ingredient experiments, 5 minute experiments Tags: ,